Board Game Recommendations?

Talk about strategy games like MoO series, Civilization, Europa Universalis, etc.

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leiavoia
Space Kraken
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Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2003 6:22 pm

Board Game Recommendations?

#1 Post by leiavoia »

Question to all: i've been playing games on friday evenings with
some folks (a very mixed croud for ages and genders, including a youngish
couple with two strange teenage daughters, myself, and a friend of mine,
possibly others). We've been playing the usual group games like Trivial
Persuit and "Texas Hold'em" poker, but i was thinking about trying something
new and less "off the department store shelf". Do you have a boardgame
recommendations for people who like to play games for an evening but who are
not necessarily grognards like some of us who design and program games for
fun? ;-)

I would really like to get Twilight Imperium, but i think it's way too
overwhelming for this kind of group. I would like it, but not everyone is
willing to mentally commit to a 4-7 hour game. I'm looking for something
strategic that can be played for a few hours.

Thanks for your help!

Tyreth
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Location: Australia

#2 Post by Tyreth »

Risk is an excellent one, though a little too random for my liking.

Diplomacy is great fun, but it takes quite a long time to play. It's something you'd be better off playing in a sequence of nights, or via email.

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Zanzibar
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#3 Post by Zanzibar »

If you can get your hands on Titan by Avalon Hill (yeah, right...) if not, try Cosmic Encounter (think Wizard's of the Coast is publishing it these days).
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utilae
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#4 Post by utilae »

He he, once me an a bunch of other friends got 2X the Risk game and played Risk all night until 5am in the morning. We used two world map boards and joined them up side be side, so there was two of each country.

guiguibaah
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Board game

#5 Post by guiguibaah »

My friend got Axis and Allies and it was a blast. I really don't like RISK that much since I find there's just too much Randomness in it (yes, all you Risk fans out there, I know about the odds of rolling 3 armies VS 2) for my liking. Axis and Allies is like Risk, except you have different units (Tanks, Infantry, Planes, Bombers, Submarines, battleships, aircraft carriers) and production sites and AA guns.. It can accomodate 5 playes (3 allies, 2 axis) maximum.
There are three kinds of people in this world - those who can count, and those who can't.

Underling
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#6 Post by Underling »

Wizards of the Coast had a great selection of games they used to sell in their retail stores. Some were board based, others somewhat resembled simplified versions of Magic or Illuminati. Some of the highlights that may still be availbale through online sources were :

Killer Bunnies - a card based game (no boosters or random cards. one game = one set) where each player had a bunny farm & used cards to enhance their bunnies and anhiliate the oppositions rabbits. Very silly, but well designed. at least 2 expansion sets were available.

Flux - a card game wiyh a single deck. The object was to clear out your hand. Allowed players to implement rules on each other similar to those you would see in drinking games like "President" (usually known by another name....). Cheap and fun.

Snatch - my all time favortite. Scrabble with bad manners. You have a large number of tiles with letters on them spread face down on a table. Players take turns flipping tiles until they can make a word. The first to see a word gets to claim it (even on others turns.) You can also steal words from others. Fro example, if you had 'cord', and the proper letters were available, I could take your word and make 'recognized'. Very addictive.

I hope this helps.

'Ling

xtifr
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#7 Post by xtifr »

While the US board game market has been moribund for a while, the Europeans (led by the Germans) have been producing a great number of excellent games recently. These games are mostly simple and quick (1-3 hours), but with quite a bit of playability and strategy.

Settlers of Catan is probably the best known (at least in the States) of this new wave of Eurogames, and is a very entertaining little trading-and-building game. (There's even a Linux version available called Gnocatan.) Highly recommended.

Vinci is one of my personal favorites. Instead of trying to build one mighty civilization to conquer the world, you have waves of new civilizations rising and conquering and declining. Each turn, you can decide whether to continue with your current civilization (using only its existing pieces) or start a new one with a new set of armies, leaving the old one to sink into decay. Special bonus tiles make each civilization unique and add to your strategic options.

Carcassonne is another very popular and entertaining game. You take turns placing tiles that have portions of cities, roads and fields. Then you try to control them using a very limited number of control markers.

Puerto Rico is more complex than the games listed above, but is a very entertaining and highly-rated game. Each turn you choose a different role as you try to make your colony grow.

I could list more (my brother has a board-game group that meets every Sunday, and I tag along occasionally), but that should be enough to get you started.

Finally, since you mentioned Twilight Imperium, I have to say that while it's probably not the kind of game you're looking for (I think you're seriously underestimating the time it takes to play), it looks to me very, very, much like the original inspiration for MoO! If you get a chance to check out a copy, skim the rules, and see if you don't think I'm right.

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